Orthodoxy V: The Flag of the World

I have always liked “capture the flag” and even more, the board version, Stratego. It is probably good to put like a #7/Sergeant inside your bombs surrounding your flag, once the #8/Miner breaks through, he will need a friend to gain the ultimate prize.

stratego

But, once again, CS Lewis comes to the rescue, here is a good quote ok a few, regarding flags and military operations:

The opening paragraph of “The Grand Miracle,” Ch. XIV of Miracles:

“The central miracle asserted by Christians is the Incarnation. They say that God became Man. Every other miracle prepares for this, or exhibits this, or results from this. Just as every natural event is the manifestation at a particular place and moment of Nature’s total character, so every particular Christian miracle manifests at a particular and moment the character and significance of the Incarnation. There is no question in Christianity of arbitrary interferences scattered about. It relates not a series of disconnected raids on Nature but the various steps of a strategically coherent invasion – an invasion which intends complete conquest and “occupation.” The fitness, and therefore credibility, of the particular miracles depends on their relation to the Grand Miracle; all discussion of them in isolation from it is futile.”

 

“No doubt Pain as God’s megaphone is a terrible instrument; it may lead to final and unrepented rebellion. But it gives the only opportunity the bad man can have for amendment. It removes the veil; it plants the flag of truth within the fortress of a rebel soul.”  (Problem of Pain, Ch. 6 Human Pain)

“But pain insists on being attended to. God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts to us in our pain: it is His megaphone to rouse a deaf world.”

(continuing, in PoP Ch. 6 Human Pain) “a bad man, happy, is a man without the least inkling that his actions do not “answer,” that they are not in accord with the laws of the universe”

another good quote from CSL’s PoP:

“God may be more than moral goodness: He is not less. The road to the Promised Land runs past Sinai. The moral law may exist to be transcended: but there is no transcending it for those who have not first admitted its claims upon them, and then tried with all their strength to meet that claim, and fairly and squarely faced the fact of their failure.”  (Problem of Pain, Ch. 4 Human Wickedness, part 7)

Next: Orthodoxy VI: The Paradoxes of Christianity

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